Hysterosalpingography (HSG)

Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is an x-ray examination used to help diagnose a suspected intrauterine tumor, mass or congenital malformation, or where the fallopian tubes may be blocked. HSG is often necessary in cases of infertility to help determine the problems involved. Ultrasound techniques have been improved so that they can also diagnose some intrauterine conditions, but not tubal blockage.

REASONS FOR PROCEDURE

  • Infertility.
  • Confirm tubal and uterine abnormalities, congenital malformation and traumatic injuries.
  • Multiple miscarriages.
  • Excessively painful menstruation.
  • Follow-up to some surgical procedures.

RISK INCREASES WITH

  • Undiagnosed vaginal bleeding.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
  • Pregnancy.

DESCRIPTION OF PROCEDURE

  • The procedure may be done in a hospital or in the office of a radiologist.
  • A spectrum is inserted into the vagina and the cervix is grasped with a tenaculum (a hooklike Instrument).
  • A dye apparatus is attached to the cervix and a dye (contrast medium) is slowly inserted into the uterus and x-rays are taken. There may be some discomfort felt as the dye is injected You may be asked to change positions for different x-ray views.
  • The x-rays will show the outline of the uterus and fallopian tubes as the dye fills them.

EXPECTED OUTCOME

  • Normal findings reveal a symmetrical uterine cavity, the dye flowing through unblocked fallopian tubes, and there is no leak of dye from the uterus.
  • The x-rays may help reveal any abnormality in the shape/size of the uterine interior scarring, tumors (fibroids) or a blockage in the fallopian tubes.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

  • Allergic reaction to the dye used in the test (hives, itching, low blood pressure).
  • Uterine perforation.
  • Infection.

POSTPROCEDURE CARE
GENERAL MEASURES

  • Some symptoms, such as mild cramping, a slow pulse, some nausea or dizziness may occur following the procedure. These are temporary.
  • Conditions detected by the hysterosalpingogram require further testing for confirmation; usually a laparoscopy or hysteroscopy (use of a small telescope to view internal organs.

MEDICATION

  • A mild sedative may be administered prior to the procedure.
  • Following the procedure, use mild painkillers, may be necessary.

ACTIVITY
No restrictions once any temporary symptoms disappear.